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Do we need a canonical question about how to deal with ransomware, so that questions like this could be marked as a duplicate instead of closed as off topic?

An answer could consist of something along the lines of:

  • You should keep backups. Restore if you have them.
  • Don't pay.
  • Check these sites out to see if your specific strain of malware can be decrypted.

Is this a good idea? Are there already a question out there that might fit the bill?

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  • security.stackexchange.com/questions/138606/… and add a ransomware section? – schroeder Jan 31 at 14:34
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    @schroeder I was thinking that question was already to broad as it is, and it feels a bit weird sneaking more questions in years after most answers were posted. But an answer to a new question should probably link to it. – Anders Jan 31 at 14:39
  • I'd just add a ransomware section to the top answer. – schroeder Jan 31 at 14:41
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    I agree with Anders though, when I clicked the link and saw the question I also thought it was rather broad to begin with. Making a canonical question sounds good to me. – Luc Feb 4 at 8:34
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EDIT: The question is now asked: Help! Ransomware encrypted my files. What do I do now?

Since there hasn't been a lot of protest, I will go ahead and post a question unless there is some more objection. Here's a draft of the question, short but sweet:

Help! Ransomware encrypted my files. What do I do now?

I just discovered that my files has been encrypted by ransomware.

  • Can I get my files back? How?
  • Should I pay the ransom?
  • What should I do so that this never happens again?

I'm setting up for an answer along the lines of:

  • Restore backups after nuking form orbit. Or check a list and see if you are lucky.
  • Probably not.
  • Keep backups.

Feedback is welcome.

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