Hot answers tagged

23

I would say keep it, but stay away from Wordpress (unless you want to use the blog as a live demonstration of the dangers of automated vulnerability scanners). I'd say a static site (published on Github Pages) would be a great idea, as it's quite easy to set up, requires no maintenance/updates, and it's easy for everyone to contribute and improve other's ...


12

Do we want to continue with our blog? My vote is no. The last post was 8 months ago, and the few blogs I follow are already well-established in the infosec community. I don't really look at Security.SE as a place to get cutting edge information. The community was inundated with dirty cow questions. Something like that would have been useful IMNSHO in a blog ...


10

I propose this question: How valuable is secrecy of an algorithm? because it tries to explore the limits of a well-known security slogan. Also, I am narcissic enough to enjoy reading my own answer.


9

I have the impression that we are planning too much and doing too little practical work over the blog revamp. We are still discussing ideas whilst no practical, viable, blog infrastructure is coming out of it. I'll first enumerate what I believe as being the issues we are facing: Resistance to a wordpress solution, this is given the fact that wordpress ...


9

While my question did not receive a shocking amount of traffic, I think the implications of it are shocking: Authenticating a Proxy server over HTTPS I think corporate types installing authenticated proxies all over their networks would be interested in knowing this... P.s. I could try to find time to write this up.... sometime....


8

As discussed in chat - the Sec.SE community, which is the expert community in this field on Stack Exchange, disagrees with your points 1 and 3, and agrees with point 2. 1 - The article is logical and describes why the proposed solution is flawed. 2 - This article ranks high on Google searches for SQRL 3 - Increases the site's reputation with experts So the ...


7

I would be a fan of keeping it. It would be nice to move it to another WordPress based host (WordPress.com, specifically) to minimize the effort required for a transition. I would be willing to volunteer to help if that is needed.


6

I have an assignment to provide auditd monitoring for a client's server. The customer has a production Linux server running an ERP application whose source code resides on the server. The standard practice for this product is for programmers to make ad-hoc changes to the code on the production system!! The client has established a dedicated test ...


6

As for the convenience and other factors about passwords or SQRL, I don't find either system particularly compelling. But for phishing, this is something that I find to be a very serious issue. I'll spare you all the technical details, but the basic issue is that SQRL is strictly out-of-band. Your identity is your phone, your phone cannot communicate with ...


6

No, stop blogging. There is not enough content. In 2016 only one post was added. Same for 2015. I see this as an indication that there are not enough authors or the authors do not have enough time or motivation to write for the blog. Many people already have their own blog where they can write posts on, so a sec.se blog does not really create a new ...


6

Before you decide to keep it or not, figure out if/how the blog could be promoted. I have been around for quite a while, but had no idea the blog existed, or that StackExchange even had blogs at all. If we can't come up with a workable, low-maintenance strategy that will drive people to read it, I see little point in trying to keep the blog alive.


4

TL;DR We should definitely keep it, I'm 100% with Xander. I should probably start writing one or two blog posts anyway, to finally get the hang of writing posts. The community blog accepts stories that are published on personal blogs of our users. This is not to say that we make a personal blog promotion and marketing suite out of the sec.SE community ...


3

I'm willing to help with edits/content. Since we want to continue on Wordpress I just can't be an admin, I have absolutely zero experience with the admin of a Wordpress site. And very little experience with PHP. (But see the second part of the post for the git idea.) I did write a handful (4-5) of seminars on GnuPG and another handful (2-3) about ...


3

I am willing to help in whatever way necessary. I hosted my own technology-centric blog for a few years, but closed it down due to no traffic and the cost associated with it. I haven't written about security outside of SE, but I do have some chops as far as producing content is concerned (in my own opinion, the traffic on my personal blog may indicate ...


2

I propose a question regarding this topic: Is Adblock (Plus) a security risk? The article itself doesn't need to center itself in the AdBlock thing, but it really can go further into the security implications about browser's plugin. I would love to help with the writing =)


2

With the blog, commenting is pretty much the only option you have, yes, but you shouldn't think of comments as being more permanent. In reality comments on SE are very much temporary, and edits are the way to make changes. Once the comment has been acted on, we can easily delete it.


1

Sorry for completely missing this post for 12 days, but yes, I am still interested in assisting and willing to commit time to it. Personally, I'm happy enough with Wordpress. It's what we used here, it's what I use for my personal blogs, and I've migrated blogs to it before. In its current form with auto-updates, its secure enough IMO as long as the ...


1

I think the most great ways will be to maintain Jekyll based blog with information containing to that relative of information security domain: could be latest gigs in pentest scectrum could be career related information related to information security could be latest hacks, how were they conducted an interview section (this might resolve the promotion ...


1

Stack Exchange posts aim at being the definite knowledge database for a specific topic, so they can be edited in case they're almost, but not quite right. Blog posts are rather more personal: they're the author's piece, so they aren't editable by just anyone. A few people have the privilege to edit blog posts. (I don't have the list of users and their ...


1

I think Jack's question "Can my IT department read my Google Hangouts chats while at work?" is definitely interesting. We have various questions on privacy expectations at work, and the answers on this one are nice and clear. Another example: Can an employer access Whatsapp messages if you are using their servers?


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