52

Google-searching is a rarefying skill. It seems to be a question of generation. Let me put some historical context. In days of my youth (say, 25 years ago, in the late 1980s and early 1990s), when you wanted to learn about something, you went to the public library and looked it up in an encyclopaedia. You also scanned the books on display to see if there ...


23

Plenty of good reasons: there might be only partial, disparate answers and no central knowledge repository the size of StackExchange with an authoritative answer there might be contradictory answers and expert help is required to make sense of them existing posts on other sites might not cover the context / hardware / software the OP is interested in the OP ...


22

This questions did strike me as especially hard over on SO, where new and/or low rep users regulary get downvoted and closed very fast. Over here on Sec.SE, because there is way less traffic, the problem is not as maddening as on SO, but still a problem we as a community should try and take care of. In fact, on SO there is a "SOCVR" team in an ...


21

I agree. I think this is mostly a problem with close votes on questions, but I just noticed this deleted answer: The author is the lead of the OWASP Zap Project - one of the more significant open source security tools. He previously answered a few questions on Security Stack Exchange - but has been silent since. A good example of how this behaviour ...


19

This is the joy of Hot Network Questions. All of the questions you mentioned were recently featured in the Hot Network Questions sidebar, which is shown on all sites. Many Stack Exchange users (including lots of people who are not members of the Security.SE community) see those questions and click on them. This exposure has advantages and disadvantages. ...


11

This is a huge topic, and a legitimate one. The question at the heart of "topic-ness" is the quality of posts. Too much noise in the questions means that the high contributing people we could be attracting will leave because "there is nothing for them here". This model was highlighted during the game that StackExchange ran for each site. There is a ...


9

I commend your restraint, I agree that these questions are pretty bad. Mainly because to be answered we first need to get clarity on what they are wanting to do/protect etc. They are hard work questions- a comment helping them improve could be a good response, but I also understand a VTC.


8

In some cases, I would say yes, a misunderstanding should be corrected by an answer. In the case of fundamental misunderstandings, or false assumptions that form the basis of a question, we certainly have users who feel that this is automatic grounds for closure, and although I don't know that I 100% agree with that in many cases, it's probably generally ...


7

There can be very real cultural reasons for asking strangers over asking a primary source. Also, there can be an element of trust in a source. How does one know that the answer they found is authoritative? On a forum, one can at least get an average of answers and deduce an authoritative direction.


6

I agree that the wrong things get upvotes. Look at my profile: +167 for a banal answer on chip & pin, while a pile of more interesting answers get only a vote or two. And it's not just because of hot network questions. I would love to see a site more aimed at Infosec professionals, but I think this is unlikely to happen. A flow of more basic questions ...


6

Asking for courses is off topic and also too localised. Any course may be localised in location, but even web-based courses suffer from possibly being time-bound. We do mention some courses, generally the industry respected, long standing ones, but in general it is just not useful on an SE site to list courses, so a) is not on topic. B)is actually ...


6

Most of the times I search for anything, (apart from wikipedia) There are just too many cleverly disguised advertisements and promotions in the first few pages in google - after awhile I feel like I am in a southpark episode. Also Articles that show up in google may not always fit my specific problem, in here I have the flexibility to comment and even ...


5

Generally no, it is not okay to cross post. If it doesn't get answered here, or the community feels it is off topic then we can migrate it over somewhere more appropriate.


5

This one bugged me recently, it was not "off-topic" but "Duplicate" How could online encryption ever work? The poster seems new, mentioned https once in their question, then got hit with "why not use Google before asking how SSL works..." It then degenerated into an argument where people debated with the author about how they better understood what they ...


5

The answers you find on Google have to come from somewhere and one of the aims that the Stack Exchange founders had was to be that somewhere. As such, asking simple, easily Googleable questions isn't inherently bad... And can generate interesting answers and as someone who has produced detailed answers to simple questions on Serverfault I can tell you that ...


4

You only got one down vote on your sqlmap question, and two upvotes, so I would not use that as an example of "downvotes" There is a lot of guidance written - it's actually pretty extensive. We haven't collated it into a FAQ, but reading the posts here on meta should give you a very good idea of our stance on most kinds of questions. So I'd suggest ...


4

This would not be a good question here, no. Cyber weapon can describe anything in the information security attack space - so the list could be as long as you want (ie it fails our answerability test) and as to being upgraded, in some cases that would make no sense at all.


4

MathOverflow and Math SE are a special case. For those who are unfamiliar: anyone can create an account on MO, but in practice, the community is largely restricted to research mathematicians (think people who have doctorates in mathematics and work at universities); on the other hand, Math SE is more of a "typical" SE site. MO was originally started as a ...


3

exchanging with people (sepacially experts) it is more benefical than asking the google. you could save time and effort. google is not always a good search engine and it gives you a custom answers related to your location/researched words..... that sometimes is not the best answer


3

Googeling is easy and quick on subjects you already know a lot about. Googeling is hard on subjects you know little about. Why? Three reasons: What should I google? If you don't know the correct terminology, you will not get the right result. Example: You want to know how the webpages you visit are encrypted, it might be hard if you don't know you should ...


2

No. Your question was confusing. Leaving it open would likely lead to answers of low quality and relevance being added to it. That doesn't help anyone. But being up on hold isn't the same as being deleted. From the help section: Questions that need additional work or that are not a good fit for this site may be put on hold by experienced community ...


1

How big of a problem is this? I had trouble finding a large number of examples of dumb tricks to generate passwords. Could you provide more examples? Perhaps the problem here is that it's subjective. I think adding foreign words to diceware or an unprintable character at the end of your password is an interesting proposition to add a small amount of ...


1

It is safe to use _, but only if you're careful. What specifically are you trying to protect with _? Bear in mind that no one security measure alone- even _- will ensure security. Security is a frame of mind, and a set of policies, more than it is simply an individual product or protocol.


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